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Kind of fucked up risotto last night. Was...yeah. Not ruined but nowhere as good as my usual. Bad mood hence.

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If there's one thing I've learned from cooking competitions on television, it's that risottos never turn out well, no matter how good you think you are at cooking.

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I hate ruining food. Cooking's quite difficult / time consuming for me because I'm so un-dexterous so it feels doubly wasteful

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I can't think of anything I like less... it looks like proper food that's been half digested and thrown up again

 

Bleurgggh :p

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They bloody are, the frosting tasted like Strawberry Ice Cream, but Jam and Strawberry Flavouring in it...Was a Test Run for my Daughters Birthday...I think it'll be a hit with folk might do chocolate as well, ooo or mint choc chip.

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They bloody are, the frosting tasted like Strawberry Ice Cream, but Jam and Strawberry Flavouring in it...Was a Test Run for my Daughters Birthday...I think it'll be a hit with folk might do chocolate as well, ooo or mint choc chip.

 

Good idea.

When is it again? I... erm... lost? my invite. Cheers.

 

:laughing:

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Does anyone make a good macaroni cheese? It appears to be my nemesis dish, but perhaps because I've just been screwing up the roux.

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Cheese sauce is a bastard to make, that's why!

 

I made Jamie Oliver's green chilli last night. It was pretty awesome- I'm a bit bored of chilli con-carne and this is a great alternative that replaces the rich beef and tomato base with a fresh pork, onion and chilli flavour. Absolutely delicious with tortillas and sour cream. The only thing I had to sacrifice was the mint (which would have really added. damn!) and I think next time I need to add more chilli and ditch the cooked off fat from the pork as it ended up being a bit too greasy. Really tasty though, all the same.

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Heat up a pan of milk til its warm (don't boil it)

 

add some cornflour (tbsp)... its usually good to mix it in a cup with water so you can smush out the lumps before it goes in the pan...

 

then add grated cheese.

cook it all very slowly keep stirring and HAVE PATIENCE it will start to get thicker. You also have to keep an eye on it the whole time, no going away because it'll either get too hot & curdle or turn into a big burnt mess.

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I have been cooking and am cool. Recent cooking exploits;

 

Foil baked Salmon with lemon. Ridiculously simple and easy way to cook fish. Digivolving this tonight with the addition of potato cakes.

 

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Chicken Kung Po with Egg Fried rice.

 

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Digivolved this two nights ago with more epic, highly seasoned, cooked egg fried rice (digivolving yet again next time, by adding peas and soy sauce for the better flavour approach) and adding water chesnuts and cashews to the sauce.

 

Lol. Obviously these are straight forward, but more advanced recipes will come.

 

 

And soon....

 

 

 

MACAROONS.

 

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First attempt at Korma. Lacked spicing and flavour, slightly too thick.

 

521419_10151774078905581_356878604_n.jpg

 

Essentially coconut block (turned into milk per packet), lots of almonds, sugar, garlic and ginger, cinnamon and chilli powder, yoghurt.

 

Second attempt at Korma (and stir in Pilau Rice flavouring), had spicing, flavour, but was far too thin.

 

525155_10151800838005581_1444047568_n.jpg

 

Coconut milk, ginger, garlic, ginger powder, cinnamon, tumeric, paprika, corriander leaves, cumin. Yogurt.

 

Back to the proverbial drawing board. Well not really, as I have two half-working attempts. I have a definitive idea with what I would do on a third attempt, but I am going to watch more recipe videos - I really want to achieve the take away taste if I can. My rice cooking skills are definitely improving. If looking at recipes and methods doesn't help, next time I will use thick double cream, more almonds for thickening.

 

Also cookies.

 

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First attempt at Korma. Lacked spicing and flavour, slightly too thick.

 

Essentially coconut block (turned into milk per packet), lots of almonds, sugar, garlic and ginger, cinnamon and chilli powder, yoghurt.

 

Second attempt at Korma (and stir in Pilau Rice flavouring), had spicing, flavour, but was far too thin.

 

Coconut milk, ginger, garlic, ginger powder, cinnamon, tumeric, paprika, corriander leaves, cumin. Yogurt.

 

Back to the proverbial drawing board. Well not really, as I have two half-working attempts. I have a definitive idea with what I would do on a third attempt, but I am going to watch more recipe videos - I really want to achieve the take away taste if I can. My rice cooking skills are definitely improving. If looking at recipes and methods doesn't help, next time I will use thick double cream, more almonds for thickening.

 

If your curry tasted bland it might be because you didn't use enough salt. Indian cooking uses salt like a spice, and your spices will taste of almost nothing without it.

 

I've been cooking rice for a long time. Here's a recipe I wrote up for another site. To make it like regular pilau take the out cumin seeds, use 1 Tbls of minced onion, or 1/2 to 1 full finely sliced onion (your preference) and these whole spices:

7 green cardamoms

3 cloves

a couple of pieces of cassia bark (cinnamon)

2 bay leaves

2 star anise

1 black cardamom

 

Split the green and black cardamoms open with your fingers/thumbs or the back of a knife.

 

Fry these and the onion together until the the onion starts going golden. When golden you can throw in 1/2 tsp of turmeric and cook out for 30 seconds, then follow the recipe from adding in the soaked rice.

 

This is a rice which showcases the flavour combination of cumin and onion. The nutty flavour of the roasted cumin and the sweetness of the lightly browned onions together with the fragrant basmati rice is a match made in heaven and must be tried. The flavour is richer and more savoury than pilau.

 

It's nice hot or cold. Although I've not tried it yet, it would be a perfect match with wild basmati and brown basmati rice by further playing on the sweet and nutty notes. Great as a savoury rice dish for say a BBQ or tandoor meats . As far as curries go, it can go with anything, but you can try and combine it with lighter or sweeter curries or less heavy and spicy or tomato based curries, but the choice is yours.

 

~ ingredients ~

 

1 Pint Basmati Rice

Vegetable oil/Ghee (no more than 2 Tbls or the rice will be greasy)

1 Pint Boiling Water

1 Medium Onion Sliced

Half Cinnamon Stick or Casia Bark

5-6 Green Cardamom (pinch the pods to open the pods a little - more flavour)

2 Cloves

2-3 Tsp (heaped) Cumin Seed

Half Tsp salt (or to your tastes)

~

 

Method

 

Wash the rice in a bowl, twice... Don't just run it under the tap. Be gentle with it so you don't crack the grains or when it cooks it will be mushy. If you have a gentle touch you can lightly 'scrub' the rice between your hands to help get the starch off. I use a metal bowl which is the best I think. Drain.

 

Soak the rice for 25-30 minutes.

 

10 minutes or so before the rice has finished soaking, heat the oil up in preferably a good heavy bottomed pan which must have a lid. Add the spices and the onion. Fry on a low to medium heat until the onions have nice light brown colour to them.

 

Tip in the pre-soaked rice and using a wooden or silicon spatula (metal or wooden spoons etc will break the rice grains resulting in mushy rice) stir and coat the rice with the onions and cumin. Work from the side of the pan and lift the rice off the bottom of the pan. Again, it's imperative to treat the rice with as much respect as possible and not crack or break the grains.

 

Add the boiling water and salt, turn the heat up to get it to boiling point. Give one last stir to mix in salt and lift the sticking grains from the bottom.

 

As soon as it's boiling put tinfoil over the pan and press it in a little so there is room for the steam to expand. Put the lid on and turn the gas to the lowest setting. Make sure the lid is tight, it is important that little to no steam escapes

 

Start the timer for 12 minutes exactly.

 

If you have electric hobs, try using CurryHell's oven rice cooking method instead.

 

After 12 minutes turn the heat off.

 

You can leave the rice sitting there and it will stay warm for quite a while. Take the lid and foil off being careful not to get burnt by the steam. Use a fork to separate the grains and hunt out the whole spices. Don't use anything that will mash the rice up like a plastic/wooden spoon. I recommend a metal spoon for serving as there is no point in mashing the cooked rice up at this point either.

 

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Edited by madeinbeats

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Having looked around, it would appear I need to use coconut powder for the authenitic take away taste.

 

Will try again next week.

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Making my first non-mince related meal tonight

 

Handling raw chicken is horrific

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Time to post a classic from my cooking adventures!

 

November 2010. Tesco holds a buy 1 get 2 free offer on 6 packs of Dr Pepper. Me, my house mate and an exchange student return with 3 6 packs each.

 

Dr.Pepper Bacon

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The Dr Pepper bacon was an experiment with two attempts, the result for both of them was "fucking hell this is delicious". We emptied about a can into the frying pan, got it pretty hot and let the bacon simmer and sit in it for half an hour. When we returned, we drained the pan and fried the bacon. Shit was gooooood. The bacon looked like it had been seasoned and the sweetness of the dr pepper went well with the taste of bacon.

 

The other attempt was to let a whole pack sit in dr pepper over night in the fridge. It left a different taste, but was still shitting awesome.

 

Twenty five gorillion out of 10.

 

Dr.Pepper noodles, bacon and salad and shit

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Our second experiment however, was pretty fucking stupid. We used bacon quite a lot in noodle dishes because it was a lot cheaper, so we thought "FUCK, THIS MIGHT BE AWESOME WITH NOODLES". It could have been, but we got carried away and basically cooked every thing in Dr Pepper. Including the greens. And the noodles, which we used dr pepper as a substitute for water.

 

Never again out of 10.

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Haha, nice culinary experiments there : D Interesting to hear that you actually got some good taste from the first batch, though. It was pretty recently when my friend tried something like this, and he said it was only ok...

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Mission complete. Made my first curry and it tasted amazing. A Chicken Madras with a decent kick to it (added a spoonful of vindaloo paste). Hopefully my dad will enjoy it

 

No sign of salmonella yet

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I have recently discovered the joys of operating a slow cooker, and the wonders of goulash! Instead of tomato and basil, italian style, it's tomato and paprika. Anyone got any slow-cooker ideas?

 

man I'm getting old. I'm way more interested in cooking than I am in gaming these days. I mean wtf, right?!

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