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N-E Book Club (or just a chat about books)

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9 hours ago, Rummy said:

His Dark Materials.

That is all.

(srsly tho probs my fave trilogy/book series of all time i only grow to love it more as I age :p)

I really want to try these at some point. Was put off by the awful film but I only ever hear good things about the book. Might make these my next set of Audio Books.

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7 minutes ago, will' said:

I really want to try these at some point. Was put off by the awful film but I only ever hear good things about the book. Might make these my next set of Audio Books.

NO! I didn't watch that film(read books well before) and I heard it was bad and they did weird things ans urrggghhh.

Read the books tho! Honestly super good! THEN watch(after you've read all three) the recent BBC/US series collboaration starring the immensely amazing Daphne Keen. Who reads the audiobooks(i dont do audiobooks)?

I can tell you many things about the series - including its ACCURATE misnaming in foreign territories as 'The Golden Compass' (it isnt actually to do with the navigational compass looking object featured in the series). Some of its symbology and layers convinces me that Pullman studied some very deep and esoteric things in his time.

 

Second to that for anyone who HAS read HDM - I read La Belle Sauvage eaelier this year(first in a trilogy of prequels) and was sufficiently if not even more impressed. Slightly different ideas and tones but some really fucking great shit. Weird part of it is also basically a basic counterintelligence manual lol. Not read the newer one yet tho.

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9 hours ago, Rummy said:

His Dark Materials.

That is all.

(srsly tho probs my fave trilogy/book series of all time i only grow to love it more as I age :p)

I need go reread these at some point. I also have La Belle Sauvage that I haven't read, so I may start off with that.

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Just now, Cube said:

I need go reread these at some point. I also have La Belle Sauvage that I haven't read, so I may start off with that.

Do Do DOOO! You'll love it. Maybe even read it before you re-read the others; theres some nods between but Pullman remains subtle as ever imo. Look for Hannah.

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2 minutes ago, Rummy said:

Who reads the audiobooks(i dont do audiobooks)?

Actually I have no idea, generally I don’t take much notice of who reads them as they tend to be just fine for listening to while running whoever it is.

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On 7/9/2020 at 12:22 PM, LazyBoy said:

Carlos Ruiz Zafron recently passed away, so it's a good time to recommend his most famous work Shadow of the Wind, a heartfelt mystery set in 1945 Barcelona. I read and recommend a lot of books, and none have been so universally loved as this book. No one who has read it has regretted it, so take the time if you're looking for something good.

This was a good recommendation, I just wish you'd mentioned that the sequels aren't worth reading. :heh:

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3 hours ago, Magnus said:

This was a good recommendation, I just wish you'd mentioned that the sequels aren't worth reading. :heh:

Never bothered with them. I didn't need a sequel.

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Me neither, but I stupidly thought, "hey, the first novel was good, so...!"

I mean... they weren't terrible or anything. They just felt unnecessary and didn't reach the heights of the first novel. Oh well.

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Out of interest are there any folks here with an interest in Asimov? I need to read much more but I low-key fell in love with him a few years back after hearing/reading some quotes of his and then read about him a bit more. The Complete Robot is a fantastic collection of Short Stories made imo even more remarkable to read now as we can contrast this world to the way it was back then when he wrote the stories - we've seen the impact of even just the idea of the Three Laws of Robotics alone. Srs legend of a mind. Also fanboyed over Sagan lol.

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Finished a couple of books. First one is The President Is Missing, by James Patterson and Bill Clinton. Actually it is credited as Bill Clinton's first novel, but I have a strong feeling most writing is done by Patterson. It gets praised because it gives insight in the way of working of an American president that only a former president can know. But to me it was just a generic political thriller and the Clinton influence wasn't very apparent. 

Also finished Japan in 100 kleine stukjes (Japan in 100 small pieces), a Dutch book which gives a good insight in Japanese culture and how it is to be a foreigner in Japan. Told in 100 small chapters filled with anecdotes, a fast but fun read. 

And because of this thread I've now started His Dark Materials #1: The Golden Compass (so I guess I have the US version because of the title). 

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40 minutes ago, Vileplume2000 said:

And because of this thread I've now started His Dark Materials #1: The Golden Compass (so I guess I have the US version because of the title). 

Obvs I'm v. passionate about the series - will love to hear your thoughts as you go along mate; I may not comment too mich til you finish whole trinity tho.

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Just finished 'Girl, Women, Other' by Bernadine Evaristo as part of my book club. Won the Booker Prize last year, and works more as a series of short stories (though there is a loose narrative thread) covering the black/female experience in Britain over the past 100 years by following a large number of characters. Whilst some of the stories were fairly fresh and drawn from perspectives I didn't expect, the majority were unsurprising and didn't tell me anything I couldn't of guessed with a decent amount of empathy and cultural analysis. What I will say is that the prose was beautiful, written semi-poetically and with a real eye to building and maintaining tempo. I ended up flying through the book in 2-3 sessions, which is not bad considering it runs to over 400 pages. Recommend if you don't need much of a plot from your books.

As a complete change of direction I have now started 'The Power Broker' by Robert Caro. Won the Pulitzer in 1974, and is a gargantuan analysis of power as told though the story of Robert Moses, who pretty much ran New York in the 60s plus change. Loving it so far, but I imagine I will be reading it for a while.

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I am taking part in this year's Nanowrimo (National Novel Writing Month). Has anyone done one before? You have to write 50K words during all of November. I've planned my one pretty much. 

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Finished a couple of books since my last post!

First one I completed was The Golden Compass/Northern Lights. I think I saw the film many years ago but nothing stuck, as I concluded when reading the book. It was... okay I guess. 

Spoiler

There are quite some interesting premises in it, and the end makes me very curious for part 2. I like the universe created as a sort of parallel Europe and that they are travelling to the North. But the book is also quite "flat". Some characters which could be interesting (and are set up as if they are) like Lee Scoresby don't really develop. Also the ease with which Lyra hops from person to person, evades or escapes tricky situations, and learns how to read the alethiometer is just too convenient. The idolizing of the bear (and always calling him first and last name) annoyed me a bit. For a coming-of-age book it was interesting that there are a few disturbing and graphical parts in there, was not expecting that! But I think this book is better enjoyed at a younger age.

Recently I saw a part of a Stephen King documentary and it got me in the mood to read some more of his work. I've read a couple of books from him (Dark Tower part 1, Misery, Lisey's Story, some short novels) and saw plenty of the movie adaptations. But I never read the "classics" such as It, The Shining, Pet Cemetery and Carrie. Started with that last one, and it was enjoyable but definitely not the best I've read. I can see though how this can make a pretty good movie.

Next up is Caliban's War (part 2 of the Expanse series by James Corey). It's been a while since I read part 1 though so I'll first look up a small summary haha. 

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