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EddieColeslaw

Hahn Bin: Avant-garde classical music

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Wikipedia reference-linkHahn-Bin (born 3 August 1987) is a Korean-American violinist. He made his international debut at age twelve at the 42nd Annual Grammy Awards and made his Carnegie Hall debut in 2009 following a decade of study with Itzhak Perlman at the Perlman Music Program and the Juilliard School.

 

I first encountered Hahn Bin when I read this article (I would recommend skipping everything before the video, some inane comments are made). His appearance is so striking that I couldn't help be distracted from the actual music at first. Apparently he's had trouble with Korean producers who convinced him to tone down his appearance for certain shows.

 

This is not the first time classical music has been presented in an avant-garde way. He reminded me first of Vanessa Mae, who plays electric violin and described her music as "violin techno-acoustic fusion".

 

The main thought this brings up is: should we do away with conventional professional attire, and make things more interesting by encouraging classicial musicians (if they so choose) to be more adventurous in their performances and appearance? Does it take away from/cheapen the quality of performance/their talent, or will it help promote classical to a more widespread audience? What's so inappropriate about breaking professional dresscodes, anyway? /canofworms

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I first encountered Hahn Bin when I read this article (I would recommend skipping everything before the video, some inane comments are made). His appearance is so striking that I couldn't help be distracted from the actual music at first. Apparently he's had trouble with Korean producers who convinced him to tone down his appearance for certain shows.

 

This is not the first time classical music has been presented in an avant-garde way. He reminded me first of Vanessa Mae, who plays electric violin and described her music as "violin techno-acoustic fusion".

 

The main thought this brings up is: should we do away with conventional professional attire, and make things more interesting by encouraging classicial musicians (if they so choose) to be more adventurous in their performances and appearance? Does it take away from/cheapen the quality of performance/their talent, or will it help promote classical to a more widespread audience? What's so inappropriate about breaking professional dresscodes, anyway? /canofworms

 

I don't think we should move away from conventional attire but allow such musicians to become a legitimate means of delivering this music. I think this will continue to happen though as we move further away from this future and more artists like this arise and we move further away from this stuffiness. I'd compare to modern film intepretations of Shakespeare plays. As an english student I'd hate to think that this would replace the tradition delivery as plays though.

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Yeah, more jokes need to be told with classical music/literature/art. It's about expression.

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